Apr 06

When I unboxed my new MacBook Pro I booted it up and followed the prompts to connect my old MacBook Air to transfer my old files across. For some reason it did not recognise my old MacBook Air. I used the USB-C cable that came with my new MacBook Pro to connect the two computers together. It didn’t work.

The next day I tried again, this time with a different cable, and it worked. The USB-C cable that is supplied with new MacBook Pro is NOT a thunderbolt cable. So you cannot use it to transfer data. Apple saved themselves some $$$ by throwing in a cheaper cable that you can only use to charge. Read on and I’ll explain the differences.

A not thunderbolt cable.

This is what a USB-C Thunderbolt cable looks like. It’s also what a NOT Thunderbolt cable looks like. They look exactly the same! Some of Apple’s cables USB-C cables are Thunderbolt and some are not. The ends looks the same, the cable looks the same, but they are not the same.

Have a look at these 2 items in the Apple Store:

These cables are both USB-C. (That refers to the shape of the connector on the end). But one is a ‘Charge Cable’ and one is a ‘Thunderbolt Cable’.

The one on the left will charge your computer. That is all it will do. The one one the right will charge your computer and it will also allow you to connect to another computer, or a SSD drive, iPad or any other Thunderbolt device.

They will both charge your computer.

It gets even more confusing if you head down to JB HiFi and but another USB-C cable because it’s possible to get a USB-C data cable that has a slower charging rate!

When you buy a USB-C cable you can get ones that charge fast, charge slowly, transfer data fast, transfer data slowly, or don’t transfer data at all. Apple’s charging cable does not transfer data at all.

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Mar 11

I just received this email form Apple telling me that my iCloud is full.

Read on to find out how to free up some of your iCloud storage space.
Continue reading ⟩
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Jun 07

Google Keep is Google’s equivalent of Apple Notes, but a bit better. It’s a place to keep snippets and other stuff. Now that our family has moved to Android phones we need a simple way that we can synchronise notes across Android and Apple devices. Google Keep seems to be the best solution. There is a Google Keep app for Android and a Google Keep app for iOS. The last piece of the puzzle is getting Google Keep on your Apple desktop computer. Here’s how.

Continue reading ⟩
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Mar 26

Notational Velocity is my favourite note taking app for little bits of information you’d like to save anywhere then be able to recall later.

Notational Velocity sync broke in October 2018 when the sync engine they relied on (Simplenote) changed the domain of their notes server. Over at GitHub there’s been a fix, but it hasn’t been distributed yet.

In the meantime, if you love Notational Velocity and can’t live without it, you can use NVAlt which is basically the same program but it’s been updated so not as to have the problem. It even uses exactly the same database.

You can download NVAlt from here: https://brettterpstra.com/projects/nvalt/

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Oct 06

If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch you’ll want the latest information available on each one.  There are a number of ways to synchronise different kinds of information. Here’s my suggestions as to the best solution for each area that needs syncing.  If you have an Android Phone read this article instead. Continue reading ⟩

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Oct 02

I’ve been trying out the world of Android Phones recently with a Google Pixel phone. Overall I have been surprised at how simple and effortless it has been to use my Google pixel phone alongside my Macintosh OS X.  I was expecting it to be a lot harder to synchronise the Google phone to my Macintosh computer but if anything I have found it easier than my old iPhone.

Each individual  application syncs its own data across the internet between the Google phone and OS X. Everything else gets synchronised by Google. I have found this approach surprising simple. It’s just a matter of finding the best application for each job.

Here’s a list of applications  that  I have found that will nicely share data between OSX, iOS and Android.

Continue reading ⟩

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Aug 02

Apple file sharing is by far the easiest way to share files if you have 2 computers on the same network. For example we have a MacBook in our family room and I have a Mac Mini in my study. Sometimes I find myself wanting to access files from the other computer. With Apple file sharing you can easily access your second computer from your first one and copy across the files you need without having to go into the other room. Here’s how to set up Apple file sharing.

Continue reading ⟩

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Jul 31

Dropbox and Google File Stream have big differences. Google Drive is best for publishing lots of files to multiple users. Dropbox is great to reliably sync files across your own computers. If you are used to Dropbox, don’t think of Google File Stream as being like Dropbox. Here are some of the differences:

  • Dropbox keeps a copy of the files locally on your computer so that you can access the files offline.
  • Google Drive only downloads the files as you need them
  • Dropbox makes it very easy to share files publicly on the web via a link.
  • Google Drive can share files publicly but it’s a little trickier to set up.
  • Dropbox is best for syncing your own personal files across multiple computers.
  • Google Drive is best for an organisation to make files available to multiple users.
  • Dropbox has less space available on the free plan.
  • Google Drive gives you 25GB of storage per user!
  • Google Drive has some great WordPress plugins available to embed documents in WordPress. (I’ve done this here)

See also:

What are the differences between ‘Google Backup and Sync’ and ‘Dropbox’

How to install Google Drive on OS X

What is the difference between ‘Google file stream’ and ‘Google backup and sync’?

 

 

 

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